INTENTIONS + SUSTAINABLE CHANGES

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This year's intentions? Everyday intentions.

Small efforts we can make each day to create sustainable and long lasting changes. Paired with a cocktail of self-kindness and adequate discipline, hello 2018.

I love tradition, I love ritual. I love honouring and celebrating ideas, seasons, and events. But there's one tradition I'll gladly abandon and that's New Year's resolutions. You know, the ones so characteristic of restrictive dieting and body shaming—been there, done that. It's no news. Not only do these notions have "temporary" plastered all over them, but they wreak of negativity and wronging (and strongly lack in health). 

I mean, aren't we already hard enough on ourselves? The start of a new year naturally brings about feelings of fresh beginnings. But this can put a lot of pressure on what we choose to resolve and the goals we set for ourselves. We're ambitious beings, we want to go big.

So often, we set incredible goals for ourselves without breaking down the steps (and time) that it will take to accomplish said goals. In order to make changes that will last, it takes time, a lot of time.

I wasn't born with a green smoothie in my hand. Like so many of you, my health got worse before it got better. Years of cultivating a kind relationship with my body (and one which I continue to work hard at sustaining) has led me to now. A major player in what has helped me get to where I am has been stripping back the layers, getting back to basics, and tuning in with my body. I've spent years observing the signs and symptoms my body uses to communicate with me, getting educated, and addressing root causes as I see fit.
 

Let's cultivate health and longevity.

Our quality of Life; fostering a healthy relationship with the mind first, the body second, and then marrying the two.

Cultivating good health through self-awareness is unique to every being on this planet—and, what I believe stems from our core values, our strengths, our gifts, and our challenges. What's important to you? What do you want? How do you want to feel versus how do you feel right now

Every person will have a different response, and a different reason for that response. 

When I ask clients these questions, I don't need them to always tell me the response. But, I do need them to have an answer for themselves. I need you to know why you want to work with me. What changes do you want to make? What information or education are you seeking? What are your big goals and what small steps can we take to attain them? 

Maybe it's more energy, to avoid an afternoon slump and to have laser focus and productivity at work. Maybe it's more energy for running around with your kids. Maybe it's no more terrible PMS symptoms or to mitigate symptoms of menopause. Maybe you're tired of getting sick the same time every year (ps. that was totally me).


We're all just a work-in-progress.

We can start new things, set new goals, and create new intentions anytime of year. We are always changing and there will be constant ups and downs, so forget perfectionism. Forget "getting it right this year." We're always changing and growing. There is no perfect, and you can press start whenever you want. 

Take your time. Determine your "why." Why do you want to feel better? Dig deep. Think longterm. Your relationship with your body is a serious one, I think.

And, if you're into putting your body through one really hellish month at the gym only to find yourself inactive for the other 11 months of the year, also ask yourself why. Is this the best option for you? Is this going to impact you positively for years to come? 

Envision and manifest big, but start small. And never stop learning; learn from all of your mistakes, every experimentation. Be kind and honour your body. Move slow (transformation takes time), and address all your needs for creating sustainable change—mind, body, and spirit.

I create space and offer guidance, so that you can get quiet with your mind, get reacquainted with your body, and learn to heal yourself from within. 

Genevieve KangComment